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In Praise Of Librarians

In Praise Of Librarians

What do you think of, what picture comes to mind, when you hear the word “librarian”? A spinster (to use a quaint term, as outmoded as this mental picture), tending dusty books in a musty library? Or perhaps, more specifically, Marian the librarian, of THE MUSIC MAN fame?

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Freedom To Read

Freedom To Read

We live in the “land of the free,” as our national anthem tells us, and that includes freedom to read whatever we please. While there are still groups that successfully petition to have certain books removed from library shelves or schools, there is no overarching governmental entity decreeing that certain books may not be read at all.

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Can Books Lead To Peace… World Peace or Peace in Our Country?

Can Books Lead To Peace… World Peace or Peace in Our Country?

Can books lead to world peace, or simply peace in our country? Can they put an end to school shootings, Pittsburgh-style atrocities, 9/11s, and overseas genocide? Well, they can’t put a total end to war or domestic violence. The world will always have troublemakers, agitators, and those who are, to put it nicely, off balance. But I bet the ordinary individuals who are swayed to follow the agitators could also be swayed in the opposite direction by books. Not just books describing and railing against the atrocities of war or books preaching respect for others—those, too—but also books about people of different backgrounds, different ethnicities, and different religions. I bet the SOB who killed those Jewish people in the Pittsburgh synagogue had never read the Diary of Anne Frank.

I “prescribe” a school reading program in which the students are exposed to age-appropriate books about people from varying backgrounds: people of color, Native Americans, foreigners, rich and poor…all varieties. And students should also be required to read about people of differing religions: Protestant, Jewish, Catholic, and Muslim at minimum, and maybe Hindu and Buddhist, too. For those students old enough, Anne Frank should definitely be on their reading list.

It’s not that I’m naïve enough to believe that just by requiring diverse reading at a young age we can put a total end to all hostility. But if we can just dial it down by half, or maybe three-quarters, that would be a wonderful start!

This Is Really Scary

This Is Really Scary

Today is Halloween. You know what REALLY scares me? It’s not the ghosties and ghoulies afoot today and tonight, nor the fake cobwebs draped in my chiropractor’s office, nor the spectre of running out of candy early in the evening–actually we don’t get ANY trick-or-treaters in this 55-and-older community. What really scares me is the thought that we are raising another generation of non-readers.

The Millennials are not big readers, and the kids of today seem to be following in their footsteps to a large extent.

Yes, there are exceptions–kids who still haunt (to use a word appropriate to today’s holiday) libraries. And yes, manga is popular with some, and I am not among those who frown on manga because they aren’t “real books.” But how many of today’s kids are putting books on their Christmas wish lists?

And how many young adults are planning to spend their Christmas cash gifts, work bonuses, and other newfound moolah on readables?

It would be a sad thing indeed if people in the main stopped reading–and sad not just for us authors but for society and civilization in general.

I’ll tell you what: We’re on the cusp of November, which for many authors and would-be authors (although I’m not a participant myself) is “NaNoWriMo”—National Novel Writing Month—during which 30 days they are challenged to start and complete writing an entire long book.

Suppose I challenge everyone reading this post to READ (at least) one whole book–and not a comic book or anything super-short–this month, and if they have kids old enough to read and young enough to still live with you, to ensure that these kids also read (at least) one age-appropriate book this month, NOT COUNTING SCHOOL ASSIGNMENTS.

Let’s get America reading again!

We Interrupt This Program

We Interrupt This Program

“We interrupt this program…” or this blog. Or as the Python folks used to say, “And now for something completely different.”

This week’s post isn’t about books, reading, or writing. Instead, I want to urge all our American readers to get out and VOTE.

This is NOT a partisan rant. We are not siding with the blue or red wave, or with any particular candidate or party. You need to vote your own conscience, whatever direction it may take you in, whichever path it leads you down. But whoever it is you favor, whatever candidates and issues or other ballot questions you choose to vote for, you DO need to get out and VOTE.

And that’s what we here at Roundtable urge you: Vote on Election Day, or vote early, or vote by mail…but VOTE.

And if your locality has any kind of referendum in favor of financial support of libraries, please vote for it. Our libraries across the nation need all the help they can get,

Again—vote your conscience, vote at your convenience (mail-in, or early, or “regular”), but VOTE.

Thank you.

Book Exchange Party

Book Exchange Party

I’ve written in this space before about the problem of having too many books, when storage becomes an issue, and good ways to find new homes for them.

Today I’ll discuss an idea for a related problem: How to dispose of books you no longer want, not because you have no room for them but simply because they didn’t meet your expectations or because, having read them once, you have no need or desire to read them again.

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Speaking Freely

Speaking Freely

We just celebrated Banned Books Week last week—if “celebrated” is the appropriate word to use when discussing books that have been removed, or requested to be removed, from libraries, schools, bookstores, and other venues.

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You Don't Have To Be An Author To Write

You Don’t Have To Be An Author To Write

Not everyone who writes is an author. You don’t have to be an author, a graduate of journalism school, or have other “authentication” conferred on you to validate your writing…and your “writing” doesn’t necessarily have to be written. Surely you have heard of “the oral tradition”—TELLING stories.

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Busy And Loving It

Busy And Loving It

So it looks like I’m starting two new ghostwriting projects. One is pure ghosting. It’s nonfiction, motivational, and I’m to structure the book from notes to be provided to me by the nominal author. The other is more of a co-writing gig, but I’m to be uncredited, so therefore it’s still ghosting. This book is also nonfiction, but this one’s religious in content.

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My Chinese Menu Worklife

My Chinese Menu Worklife

Very few book authors write nothing but books all day every day. Leaving aside the necessity of submissions of unpublished manuscripts, publicizing published books, and all the other requisite miscellany in an author’s professional life, most book authors do other types of writing as well. Continue Reading

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